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American Quaker Sampler stitched by Krista

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Saturday, 22 March 2014

An unusual alphabet and an unusual Irish (?) sampler




This is one of the most unusual alphabets I've seen on a sampler.  This sampler has preoccupied me for months. It's probably German, dated 1704.  I wish I had seen the alphabets on this sampler before publishing "More Alphabets from Early Samplers".  In fact there are so many unique motifs on this particular sampler that I can't find precedents in the early German pattern books.  This is very exciting!

The second set of photos show an antique sampler that I acquired recently at auction.  It was described as being from Ireland, but the illuminated letters and other quirks look Scottish.  The basket and verse look more Balch School.  We might be on to a new thread here and I welcome your input.

Over and out,
love to all,
Marsha

6 comments:

Krista said...

Love the alphabets! Some of the letters remind me of the large alphabet in SDW German sampler, and the illumination reminds me of the curlies on the large bouquet of SDW too. Does have a Scottish look too, so interesting. Thank you for sharing, Marsha!

Lanie said...

Ahhhh ... 'new' antique samplers ... just like Christmas morning! Of course I like them both ... my family is of German ancestry, so I am particularly interested in stitching a German alphabet sampler.
Thank you, Marsha, for sharing :)

Natasha said...

Lovely new acquisitions. I really like the alphabet in the first one, very unique.

Jenny said...

Both samplers are just wonderful! It is so much fun to see what samplers you find....I love them all.

zenuwpees said...

Les deux samplers sont magnifique Marie-Claire

C Street Samplerworks said...

I love both, but especially the Irish sampler. It's so different--so many lovely bands & great alphabets.

The name "Droughtville Forest" sounded fascinating to me, so I googled and found that it's in central Ireland near County Meath, where our ancestors lived. I checked on Ancestry.com, and not surprisingly, the family name "Drought" is very common in that area.

I hope you'll be charting it--it looks like it would be a lot of fun to stitch.